Tag: Bartender

Using Math During The Holidays

With the holidays coming upon us, and knowing that many people eat out during the holidays, I thought it would be nice to make a post which discusses how to use math and make the appropriate tip after eating or drinking. I found a nice article on this topic at articledashboard.com. Check it out!

How To Tip At US Restaurants And Bars

Tipping culture is rife in US restaurants, and it is an important custom for those working in the service industry. It’s become so ingrained that there are well-known consequences for skimping on gratuity. Failing to tip a bartender after each round of drinks, for example, well, it wouldn’t happen. After not tipping the first time, you’re not going to get another round. Here is a guide to tipping in restaurants and bars during your US travels.

If you get up and order your drinks at the bar the standard tip is one dollar per drink. For cocktails or specialty requests, such as a Boston sour with egg white, an extra buck is preferred for the time it takes to make these drinks. Custom dictates that after purchasing the drinks, you leave the tip on the bar. Don’t hand it directly to the bartender, especially if it is busy. They will see it and pick it up. If you see a few dollars on the bar, leave them. Those are tips from other customers. If you don’t have a lot of change on you, you can tip the bartender a larger sum after the first round which will cover the next few, just remember to return to the same one when ordering.

When settling a bar tab, you can calculate 20% of the total to determine the appropriate tip. Most won’t show the amount of drinks you’ve ordered, but the amount should come to about the same. If you want better service, tip more (a few dollars extra is all it takes). If you’ve bought drinks at restaurants with your meal that the waitperson has brought to you, the bartender will receive a percentage of the total tip that you leave with your bill. If there is a bouncer on the door of a club you regularly frequent, tip them a few bucks for future perks. They do remember.

At restaurants, 15 to 20% is the standard, left after the bill has been paid on the table. If paying by card, a tip can be added on the receipt. If you’re terrible at math, doubling the tax and rounding up is roughly correct. Tipping more is always encouraged, but tipping less is an insult. If you receive bad service, ask to speak with a manager rather than throwing a few coins down. In fact, no tip sends a stronger message than a measly dollar or two. For large parties, gratuity is usually included in the total. It will say so at the bottom of your bill.

Many tourists are against the tipping culture, but it’s important to follow customs in a host country. People in the service industry receive low wages, sometimes below minimum, so tips make up a large portion of their take home earnings. Minimum wage is also not a livable income in most areas, and workers in the industry are largely considered casual, meaning they are not provided with any benefits such as health insurance, sick pay, or even holiday leave. A few good tips can mean a doctor’s visit or a paid utility bill.

By: Anna Woodward

Fresno restaurants can satisfy the whole family. To help you choose the right one for a night out, visit: www.myyp.com

 Personally, I usually leave a 20% tip. And remember that the tip is calcualted before the tax is added in. To do that, just take the total and multuply it by 2 and drop the last digit! So a $25 meal would render a (25 x 2 = 50)  $5 tip.

Hope that helps!

Have yourself great holiday season!

 

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