Tag: Brain Teasers

Kids Can Learn Math With Fun

What does it take to get a child’s interest?

It has been my experience that having some fun while presenting a challenge seems to pique a child’s interest!

I read this article on the subject of helping a child to learn math which I wanted to share with you.

Getting Kids Interested In Math Is About Fun And Games

When students complain about math homework with comments like, “I hate it!” “It’s too hard,” “I can’t!” It usually means that the child has math anxiety that keeps the negative attitude going due to frustration with the subject matter.

But don’t worry; there’s a way that parents can help their students learn to like math through fun and games. Action games with plenty of cool characters will make math homework and learning complicated formulas fun. Games will also allow better recall of what he/she learned because game characters will be remembered along with the concept illustrated. Puzzles are great for cognitive and memory instruction. They come in many different themes for just about every type of mathematical problem and type. Using a theme, such as rockets, space, animals, and cartoon characters, will let the student learn through relationships between the theme and math problems.

Math trivia will not only help the student learn math concepts but also learn amazing, little known facts. The search results are in…and the best news is brain teasers are beneficial for the mind. Look upon a brain puzzler as a mind gymnasium, by extending and examining the brain, learning ability greatly increases. The more you practice, the more adept you will become. Brain teasers are not merely mindless child’s period of play. They are significant informative instruments to direct your child through the basic principles of math. Kids study better once they can have more fun from the instruction.

Several kinds of brain teases for every kind of learner are available. Irrespective of what grade your youngster is, there are all different types of teasers with varied stages of difficulty to aid in stimulating their mind and help the studying method. Children love to have fun. Therefore, why not allow them to experience merriment with some cool interactional mathematics games? There’s nothing improper with stimulating play and discovery simultaneously.

Play solitarily or with other people; and for a greater challenge they could role play with the computer. Interactive mathematics games are self-paced and they allow for prompt feedback. Zero waiting time to get an exam paper marked to check how good they recognize a math theory. Likewise, you can apply comparable worksheets and solution keys for further exercise. These games are absolutely habit-forming due to having your child desiring to practice on the computer to practice additional math problems.

Apply them within your whole family to do and go over all kinds of mathematics skills they will remember. “By giving a child a three-dimensional interactive learning game, you are incorporating the primary levels of learning: tactile, visual, auditory, and neurological,” says Kathleen Halloran, a retired educator of 34 years.

By: FastSubmitArticles.com

Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com

John Ashley is a mathematical educator who developed the mathematickle line of educational math games and books to help children have more fun with mathematics.

So now you know how to get your child interested in learning math!

What do you think?

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Math at Easter-Time

The holidays can be lots of fun for children. Not just because they get candy and gifts, but because they also get off from school!

But just because they’re off from school, doesn’t mean that you can’t still help them learn math!

Teresa Evans wrote a nice article for ezinearticles.com which helps you take advantage of Easter and teach your children math while still making it fun.

Easter Math Is Fun Math

Easter is an exciting time for kids. But the good thing is that you can use that excitement to help kids develop their math skills. Turning regular math into Easter math makes math much, much more exciting. You can use Easter math games or Easter Brain Teasers and the kids will beg you for more.

Below are some simple ways that you use Easter math in the classroom or at home.

Bunny Hop
Here is a simple Easter math game that you can use to practice any basic math skill. You start by selecting a start line and a finish line. Next two children compete to jump from the start to the finish by taking two bunny hops every time they answer a question correctly. You can use any questions that help kids to practice the skill that you want. For example you could ask ‘6 times 8’, ‘half of 34’ or ‘What is the number before 87’? The first child to answer correctly takes two jumps and the first one to reach the finish line is the winner.

Easter Counting
You may know the old favorite counting game Buzz. But did you know that you can easily turn this into an Easter math game by replacing the word ‘Buzz’ with an Easter word. Try using ‘Bunny’ or ‘Easter Egg’ instead. The kids sit in a circle and count around a circle but replace the number 7, each multiple of 7 and every number containing a 7 digit with the word ‘Bunny’. If a child says the number instead of saying ‘Bunny’ they are out.

This is a tricky game that requires concentration and a good knowledge of multiples. You can also try playing it with other digits instead of 7. For example, you could use 5 or 10 for an easier version or use 8 or 9 to make a more challenging version.

Easter Brain Teasers
Brain teasers are a great way to get kids thinking math. Many number problems can also be made a lot more interesting by using Easter as a theme for the problem. Here are a few that you can start with.

The Easter Bunny has 15 Easter Eggs in a Basket. He gives our 3 then collects 7 more then gives 6 children 2 eggs each. How many eggs in the basket now?
You can easily change the numbers in this one and then have a completely new problem to present.

Tom has been dyeing eggs. He used green and red dye. If he has dyed 17 eggs and he has 5 more red eggs than green eggs. How many eggs does he have of each color?

How many eggs did I find in the Egg Hunt? I found between 10 and 30. The number is divisible by 4 but not by 7 or 8. I found an even number of eggs.

There are many different ways to use Easter math get kids adding, multiplying, comparing and using other math skills. You’ll find that kids will definitely agree that Easter makes math loads more fun.

Terese Evans is a teacher and parent who uses games to get kids excited about learning. She shares her favorite Kids Easter Activities including Easter worksheets, board games, card games and game sheets at http://www.kids-easter-activities.com. You can receive your own printable Easter Activities for Kids when you visit http://www.kids-easter-activities.com.

While the kids may all agree, I know that I certainly do too!

Have a great Springtime and Easter (if you celebrate it)!

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