Tag: Confidence

Multiplication Tables – Are They Helpful?

Multiplication Tables – Are They Helpful?

Young math learners often struggle with learning the multiplication tables. Often they will question their parents and teachers as to the validity and importance of learning them. So if you’re looking for a good comeback for this question, I think this article will help you! And it should also help you to get a few new ideas for assisting your child in learning their multiplication tables.

The Importance Of Memorising Multiplication Tables

Learning multiplication tables is an inevitable step into the world of maths. Children begin learning their times tables in 2nd and 3rd grade. Often, some children will have a natural flare for learning their multiplication tables while others might find it difficult.

Usually, teachers depend on parents to assist their struggling children at home. Sadly this can lead to a frustrating learning experience with a child who is finding multiplication tables particularly challenging. It can end up causing parents to question the necessity of times tables altogether.

Is it?

YES! VERY!

Why?

Memorising the multiplication tables prepares children for the future stages of maths. These future stages involve more challenging calculations that bring in division – both short and long – as well as more complicated mathematics.

To skip the fundamental learning stage of times tables would be like teaching a child to run before they have learned to walk.

Consequently they will crawl through more complicated maths – such as two-digit multiplication and long division – with great difficulty.

Bearing this in mind, we can confidently conclude that the times tables are essential to learning. Without them a child’s confidence and capability will be lost.

The important of times tables must also be taken in its broader context to fully appreciate how necessary it is. It is not exclusive to schools or learning environments, but also in our everyday lives! We often use multiplication for something as simple as calculating prices in the shops, planning parties and in domestic activities such as cooking, calculating bills etc.

All of these necessary and everyday tasks are made easier and achieved faster when one knows their times tables.Now, while these are valid points to any adult, it’s another thing trying to encourage a child who is struggling with their times tables.

It’s important to note that in some situations a child’s struggle can be chalked up to a learning difficulty – especially if they are receiving consistent help from parents and teachers. If this is the case then a child will need to be given alternative methods for learning their multiplication tables.

A child must always be supported and encouraged.It is vital that parents do NOT reprimand or criticize their children. The child is struggling enough as it is! Negative emotions and pressure will sabotage a child’s learning capability – in some cases it is severe enough to completely prevent the learning of new information.

Multiplication tables can be learned in a variety of new and innovative methods. These new learning styles allow for a child to find the best method to suit the way they process information.

Some of these new methods include taking a more visual approach to learning. Games, flash cards, interactive software, the use of animals and cartoon characters to encourage children. An almost holistic approach to maths that makes facts FUN to learn.

When the method of learning these multiplication facts is made engaging and entertaining for children, then they are far more likely to retain the information learned. Memorising the multiplication tables through these new methods makes a necessary and educational experience both fun and MEMORABLE!

By: Olivia Chandler

Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com

For more information on Multiplication, goto www.timestablesmaths.com.

One other resource I’ve found is on Youtube.com. Check on there for multiplication table videos – there are some very good ones that I’m sure your child will like!

Have a great day!

 

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Multiplication Tables Memorization Or Not

I found an interesting article with an alternative way of learning the multiplication tables. While it doesn’t cover all of the numbers, it does work for the numbers between 10 – 20. Check it out!

Memorizing The Multiplication Tables To 20 – That’s Just Crazy!

Do you have a child who needs a confidence-boost in school? Imagine if your child knew the multiplication tables up to 20. It would make him or her seem like a genius compared to most school children who have problems even remembering 7 x 8!

If you are like most people, you probably think that memorizing the times tables to twenty would be a heck of a chore. It would! It would be crazy!

I feel sorry for anyone who’s already done that when they read ahead and learn the method to get the answer to any multiplication problem with whole numbers between 10 and 20, fast, with no need for memorization. They would have saved weeks of boring, rote memorization if they used this method instead.

Here’s how you do it:

Let’s say you are multiplying 12 x 17.

Step 1) Add the ones column of either of those numbers to the other number. In this case you could add either 7 + 12 or 2 + 17. (Both would give you the same result, namely 19). Put a zero after it, to get 190.

Step 2) Get the product of the last digits of each of the original numbers (that would be 2 x 7, which would give you 14).

Step 3) Add the two numbers you got. In this case that would be 190 + 14. You’d get 204, and you’d be done, because 12 x 17 = 204.

That’s how easy it is, and it works for any numbers between 10 and 20!

Try 19 x 14.

1) 19 + 4 = 23. 23 with a zero at the end is 230.
2) 9 x 4 =36
3) 230 + 36 = 266, which is the correct answer. Piece of cake!

Please, please, please don’t ever write anything down when you do this! It wlll defeat the whole purpose of this method. Writing down things that a child’s mind should be able to do is like training yourself to use crutches when you don’t need them. The whole point of this is to trust your brain, and learn to do simple math mentally.

Here are some more examples. Once you have practiced them, you should become fast enough to amaze anyone, especially an elementary school teacher. A third-grader should be able to do these with ease in a short time, and become the “Einstein” of his or her class.

18 x 13
15 x 16
19 x 18
17 x 14
12 x 16

You may come across instances where you will have to carry. You will automatically understand how to do that if you pay attention.

Remember, you are trying to boost confidence, and you can’t do that unless you have the basics down. With the basic multiplication tables “in your bones,” this way to multiply numbers up to 20 can be a “reputation-maker.”

Of course, if you or someone you know (your child or student, maybe?) hasn’t totally mastered the “multiplication tables,” the above method won’t do you much good, will it? You’ll be happy to know that there is a fool-proof, easy way to teach or learn the basic times-tables in minutes, and it’s even easier than the the method for multiplication of 10 through 20. Learn to Multiply with this Easy Method, now.

By: Professor Homunculus

Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com

Brian Foley (a.k.a. “Professor Homunculus”) is the creator and web manager of Math Mojo and The Math Mojo Chronicles. He’s presented his Math and Magic programs at schools, corporations, and other facilities throughout the U.S. and Europe.

Try it out with your child and see how they like it?

Cheers!

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Do You Have To Be Smart To Learn Math?

Some people believe that “smart” people should learn math easily. Is that something you believe?

Well if you do, you need to read this article that I found on ezine-articles.com!

I Know My Child Is Smart, So Why Can’t He Learn Math?
By Shirley Slick

The good news and short answer to the question: He can learn math! What needs to happen to make your child successful depends on the age of your child and the time and effort you and your child are willing to invest.

This pattern of children, who are successful in other areas, struggling with math is very common. And, unfortunately, it seems that there is not much being done to change this pattern. There is promise for the future in some relatively new brain research that has shown us that babies are actually born with an innate number sense just as they are born with an innate language sense. In addition, we have learned that the critical years for laying the foundation for logic and math success is ages 1 to 4. This runs contrary to what has historically happened with the education of our children. What has always been assumed is that parents of pre-school aged children would actually take on the task of helping their children with learning to walk, talk, develop language, and lay the foundation for reading and writing. At the same time, the child is receiving almost constant encouragement and reinforcement with the associated development of positive self-concept. Both parent and child just know the ability to learn is in place.

Unfortunately, this is not the case in mathematics. Until this new research, which is still unknown by most people, the assumption was that young children were not capable of learning mathematics; so parents did little more than introducing counting. And no one has ever expected any more. The result is that children are not getting the pre-school foundation and confidence that is necessary for future success in math. When these children enter school, they are quickly overwhelmed with the amount of new material presented with absolutely no foundation on which to build. The pace of new material increases as children move through school. Since they have no ingrained confidence in their own ability to learn they lack the persistence to keep trying for success. By the time these children reach high school and Algebra, the 50% failure rate becomes understandable–not acceptable–but understandable.

So what do we need to do for your child? Unfortunately, once your child is in school, that critical period of ages 1 to 4 has already been missed. This doesn’t mean things are hopeless. It just means that it will take more effort to overcome the weaknesses. My recommendations need to all be happening at the same time. First, you need to hire a tutor who specializes in assessment and skill repair. As the parent, you need to discuss with the entire family unit–aunts, uncles, grandparents–all the people who worked so diligently during the pre-school years to reinforce all of your child’s accomplishments with language to continue doing the same thing with math. Everyone in the family unit needs to be constantly reinforcing every success with math and also stressing the importance of mathematics to the child’s future. School, education, and mathematics all need to be talked about in positive terms. This is often the most difficult thing to do because so many adults had bad experiences with math for exactly the same reasons. We need to break the cycle. If your feelings about math are negative, then you will need to practice some positive talk.

It is appropriate to explain to your child about the new research into when the mathematics foundation should be started, stressing that you were a victim of this lack of information as well. But constantly stress to your child that you know that he/she is capable of learning. With a tutor working on skill repair and confidence building as well as family members showing an interest in your child’s success and stressing your child’s ability to learn, you should start seeing a turn to the positive very soon. The younger the child, the quicker this will happen. If your child is in high school, a turn around will take much longer but it is possible. The key really is your confidence in your child’s ability to learn. Frequently remind your child about the difficulty of learning to walk and talk and read and write. Your child mastered these, so learning anything really is possible. I hope it goes without saying that you must always be reinforcing your child’s accomplishments and never be critical of your child or punish results.

If your child is struggling with math when other subjects have not been problematic, then you really can turn things around pretty quickly. But it is important to start immediately. Include your child in every discussion and interviewing tutors. Make sure they understand that these efforts are to make their future better. Older kids sometimes resent this as intrusion and won’t cooperate. If your child is not cooperative, then you will be wasting your money. You may need to work on confidence building before you can work on skill repair. You cannot force an older child to want to learn. All you can do is your best. For older kids keep stressing that success is possible if your child chooses to succeed; and that you will help in every way you can.

Shirley Slick, “The Slick Tips Lady,” is a retired high school math teacher and tutor with degrees in Mathematics and Psychology and additional training in brain-based learning/teaching. Her goals: (1) to help parents help their children with math, (2) to help eliminate the horrendous Algebra failure rate, and (3) to inform the general public about problematic issues related to the field of education. For your free copy of “10 Slick Tips for Improving Your Child’s Study Habits,” visit her website at http://myslicktips.com/

So there you have it – just because you and/or your child are considered smart does not necessarily mean that you will learn math easily.

However, a little persistence and the correct steps will help to ensure that math is successfully learned.

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