Tag: Correct Answer

Problem Solving Can Help You Learn Math

Quite often when people hear “problem solving” and math, their eyes glass over and they almost lose consciousness!

Yet even though it has a reputation for being extremely difficult, problem solving can truly help a student learn math skills as well as become more proficient at learning life reasoning skills!

I found this article at Article Alley by Dennis McLynn that I’d like to share with you.


Learning Math Through Problem Solving

Problem solving is an important component of mathematics education. It is a method that enables students to achieve a functional and logical understanding of math. Mathematics is an essential subject because of its practical role to the individual and society. Through a problem-solving approach, this practical aspect of mathematics can be developed. Problem solving is a method for students to construct, evaluate, and refine theories about mathematics.
Presenting a math problem to students and developing the skills needed to solve that problem is more motivational than teaching the skills without context. Such motivation gives problem solving special value as a method for learning new concepts and skills or reinforcing skills already acquired. Learning mathematics through problem solving can create a context which mimics real life and justifies the mathematics rather than treating it as an end in itself.

Problem solving is more than a process for teaching and reinforcing mathematical knowledge and helping to meet everyday challenges. It is also a skill which can enhance logical reasoning. Individuals cannot function optimally in society by simply knowing the rules to follow to obtain a correct answer. They also need to be able to determine which process a situation requires. Problem solving can be developed as a valuable skill in itself, as a way of thinking, rather than just the means to an end of finding the correct answer.

One of the goals of teaching math through problem solving is to encourage students to refine and build their own processes over time, as their experiences allow them to discard some ideas and become aware of additional possibilities. In addition to developing knowledge, students can also develop an understanding of when it is appropriate to use specific strategies. In this approach, the emphasis is on making students more responsible for their own learning. There is considerable importance placed on exploratory activities, observation and discovery, and trial and error.

Problem solving should be the focus of teaching and learning math because it encompasses skills and functions which are an important part of everyday life. It can also help people adapt to changes and unforeseen problems in their careers and other parts of their lives. Problem solving should underlie each aspect of mathematics teaching in order for students to experience of the power of math in the world around them.

By: Dennis McLynn

Dennis McLynn is the Vice President of Strategic Marketing & Business Development for High Points Learning. HighPoints Learning (HPL) is a leader in Web-based math education and instruction. HPL offers an online math tutoring program that helps raise participants’ math scores an average of 15 points in pre and post testing. HighPoints Learning services the 3-12 grade market. For more information visit: ehighpoints.com

So Mr. McLynn makes some good points, right? Did he succeed in making you less fearful of word problems?

Let me know!

Have a great day!

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Multiplication Tables Memorization Or Not

I found an interesting article with an alternative way of learning the multiplication tables. While it doesn’t cover all of the numbers, it does work for the numbers between 10 – 20. Check it out!

Memorizing The Multiplication Tables To 20 – That’s Just Crazy!

Do you have a child who needs a confidence-boost in school? Imagine if your child knew the multiplication tables up to 20. It would make him or her seem like a genius compared to most school children who have problems even remembering 7 x 8!

If you are like most people, you probably think that memorizing the times tables to twenty would be a heck of a chore. It would! It would be crazy!

I feel sorry for anyone who’s already done that when they read ahead and learn the method to get the answer to any multiplication problem with whole numbers between 10 and 20, fast, with no need for memorization. They would have saved weeks of boring, rote memorization if they used this method instead.

Here’s how you do it:

Let’s say you are multiplying 12 x 17.

Step 1) Add the ones column of either of those numbers to the other number. In this case you could add either 7 + 12 or 2 + 17. (Both would give you the same result, namely 19). Put a zero after it, to get 190.

Step 2) Get the product of the last digits of each of the original numbers (that would be 2 x 7, which would give you 14).

Step 3) Add the two numbers you got. In this case that would be 190 + 14. You’d get 204, and you’d be done, because 12 x 17 = 204.

That’s how easy it is, and it works for any numbers between 10 and 20!

Try 19 x 14.

1) 19 + 4 = 23. 23 with a zero at the end is 230.
2) 9 x 4 =36
3) 230 + 36 = 266, which is the correct answer. Piece of cake!

Please, please, please don’t ever write anything down when you do this! It wlll defeat the whole purpose of this method. Writing down things that a child’s mind should be able to do is like training yourself to use crutches when you don’t need them. The whole point of this is to trust your brain, and learn to do simple math mentally.

Here are some more examples. Once you have practiced them, you should become fast enough to amaze anyone, especially an elementary school teacher. A third-grader should be able to do these with ease in a short time, and become the “Einstein” of his or her class.

18 x 13
15 x 16
19 x 18
17 x 14
12 x 16

You may come across instances where you will have to carry. You will automatically understand how to do that if you pay attention.

Remember, you are trying to boost confidence, and you can’t do that unless you have the basics down. With the basic multiplication tables “in your bones,” this way to multiply numbers up to 20 can be a “reputation-maker.”

Of course, if you or someone you know (your child or student, maybe?) hasn’t totally mastered the “multiplication tables,” the above method won’t do you much good, will it? You’ll be happy to know that there is a fool-proof, easy way to teach or learn the basic times-tables in minutes, and it’s even easier than the the method for multiplication of 10 through 20. Learn to Multiply with this Easy Method, now.

By: Professor Homunculus

Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com

Brian Foley (a.k.a. “Professor Homunculus”) is the creator and web manager of Math Mojo and The Math Mojo Chronicles. He’s presented his Math and Magic programs at schools, corporations, and other facilities throughout the U.S. and Europe.

Try it out with your child and see how they like it?

Cheers!

.

.

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,