Tag: Digits

Cool Math Tricks

I find it fascinating when I can learn a new trick to help with mathematical problems. So as you can imagine, I thoroughly enjoyed this article!

Cool Mental Math Tricks

The fantastic 11 rule
There is a great likelihood that many people know the 10 rule. That is, when you multiply a number by 10, you add a 0 at the end of the number. However, the 11 rule may be unknown to many. It is so easy to comprehend.
– As you multiply any two digit number by 11
– Let us take 36 for this example (3-6) and notice the gap in between them.
– Then, sum up the two digits, 3 and 6 together
– Put the result, 9 in the gap in between.
– That is simply done 39 x 11=3 96
However, there is one tricky thing that you should remember, if the result after you have added the two digits is more than9, put only the digit representing the “ones” in the gap. For example:
74×11…7_4….4 +7=11…
Put the 1 in the gap, and add 1 to the 7 to get 8, therefore, the answer to 74 x 11 = 814
How to multiply by 999, 99 or 9
Multiplying a number by 9 is just like multiplying it by 10-1.
As such, multiplying 9 × 9 is9 (10-1) whose result is 90 -9 = 81
Another example:
9 × 68… = 68 10-1)
= 680 – 68
= 612
To multiply a number by 99 is the same as by (100-1)
47 multiplied by 99….47 (100-1)
=4700-47…=4653
Multiplying a number by 1000 means the same as multiplying the same by (1000-1)
Therefore, 55 multiplied by 1000 is the same as…..55(1000-1)
=55000-55
=54945
How to squ9are two digit numbers
Take for example that you want to square 48. The first step is squaring each of the digits to get the partial results.
4 × 4 16 and 8 × 8 = 64. Then put the two digits together, 1664.
From there, you should multiply the digits of the number that you want to square….4 × 8=32
Double the resulting product to get 64
Add 64 to 1664 to get the answer as
Mathematics can be a terrifying idea for many people but with these cool mental math tricks and a bit of practice to perfect them, the general knowledge and speed in math will considerably improve.

By: Borat Noviak

Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com

So there you have it – another cool math trick to add to your always-growing math resource library.

Have a great day! 

To learn much more about the mental maths, mental math tricks can be found at mentalmathtricks.com/.

 

 

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Multiplication Tables Memorization Or Not

I found an interesting article with an alternative way of learning the multiplication tables. While it doesn’t cover all of the numbers, it does work for the numbers between 10 – 20. Check it out!

Memorizing The Multiplication Tables To 20 – That’s Just Crazy!

Do you have a child who needs a confidence-boost in school? Imagine if your child knew the multiplication tables up to 20. It would make him or her seem like a genius compared to most school children who have problems even remembering 7 x 8!

If you are like most people, you probably think that memorizing the times tables to twenty would be a heck of a chore. It would! It would be crazy!

I feel sorry for anyone who’s already done that when they read ahead and learn the method to get the answer to any multiplication problem with whole numbers between 10 and 20, fast, with no need for memorization. They would have saved weeks of boring, rote memorization if they used this method instead.

Here’s how you do it:

Let’s say you are multiplying 12 x 17.

Step 1) Add the ones column of either of those numbers to the other number. In this case you could add either 7 + 12 or 2 + 17. (Both would give you the same result, namely 19). Put a zero after it, to get 190.

Step 2) Get the product of the last digits of each of the original numbers (that would be 2 x 7, which would give you 14).

Step 3) Add the two numbers you got. In this case that would be 190 + 14. You’d get 204, and you’d be done, because 12 x 17 = 204.

That’s how easy it is, and it works for any numbers between 10 and 20!

Try 19 x 14.

1) 19 + 4 = 23. 23 with a zero at the end is 230.
2) 9 x 4 =36
3) 230 + 36 = 266, which is the correct answer. Piece of cake!

Please, please, please don’t ever write anything down when you do this! It wlll defeat the whole purpose of this method. Writing down things that a child’s mind should be able to do is like training yourself to use crutches when you don’t need them. The whole point of this is to trust your brain, and learn to do simple math mentally.

Here are some more examples. Once you have practiced them, you should become fast enough to amaze anyone, especially an elementary school teacher. A third-grader should be able to do these with ease in a short time, and become the “Einstein” of his or her class.

18 x 13
15 x 16
19 x 18
17 x 14
12 x 16

You may come across instances where you will have to carry. You will automatically understand how to do that if you pay attention.

Remember, you are trying to boost confidence, and you can’t do that unless you have the basics down. With the basic multiplication tables “in your bones,” this way to multiply numbers up to 20 can be a “reputation-maker.”

Of course, if you or someone you know (your child or student, maybe?) hasn’t totally mastered the “multiplication tables,” the above method won’t do you much good, will it? You’ll be happy to know that there is a fool-proof, easy way to teach or learn the basic times-tables in minutes, and it’s even easier than the the method for multiplication of 10 through 20. Learn to Multiply with this Easy Method, now.

By: Professor Homunculus

Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com

Brian Foley (a.k.a. “Professor Homunculus”) is the creator and web manager of Math Mojo and The Math Mojo Chronicles. He’s presented his Math and Magic programs at schools, corporations, and other facilities throughout the U.S. and Europe.

Try it out with your child and see how they like it?

Cheers!

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Some Fun With Math

Making math interesting is what we like to do! So we’re always keeping an eye out for different ideas that will help students learn math while at the same time letting them have some fun. The article below will give you some good ideas that you can try which should help your child learn math and have fun as well.

Grab A Deck Of Cards And Try These Fun Math Games

Want to get the children practicing math skills?
You could use commercial math games but these can be expensive.
For a fun math game that assists kids to practice adding or multiplying, just grab a deck of playing cards and you’re ready.

Yes, believe it or not there are heaps of math games contained in that one pack of playing cards. Try these to begin and then have a go at inventing your own. You can practice addition, times tables, comparing numbers and numerous other number skills.

Multiplication Over and Under
This game is an ideal way to practice multiplication tables. Use a pack of cards with the colored cards taken out. The Aces count as 1. Deal all of the cards out to the two players. One player becomes the Under 30 player and the other becomes the Over 30 player.
Each player turns over a card at the same time and the two numbers are multiplied together. If the answer is below 30, the Under 30 player gets the cards. If it is more than 30, the Over 30 player keeps the cards. If the answer is 30 each player takes back their card and returns it to their deck. When all cards have been played the player with the most cards is the champion.

Highest Number
Kids love this fun math game that practices comparing numbers. All you need is cards from Ace (which is valued at 1) to 9 for this game. Next choose the number of digits to be used in the numbers for this game, e.g. 2 digit numbers like 24 and 79; 3 digit numbers like 713 or 921; 4, 5 or 6 digit numbers. Every person is dealt that number of cards. Players arrange their cards to make the biggest possible number with the cards that they have been dealt, e.g. with cards 2, 5 and 8 a player would make 852.
The player with the biggest number in each round scores a point. The winner is the person who scores the highest points.

First to Fifty Addition
Take it in turns to deal two cards to each person. Each player then turns over the two cards they have been dealt, adds the two amounts and tells how much this is, e.g. 5 and 7 is 12. The player with the largest total keeps the two cards while the other cards are returned to the deck which is shuffled and dealt again. Players add the value of the cards they have won until a player gets to fifty and wins.

First to Fifty Multiplication
Play this game the same as First to Fifty Addition but instead of adding the 2 cards to get a total, multiply the two values on the cards, e.g. 7X6 is 42. Players then add the value of the cards that they win to get to fifty.

These fun card games can be played by a parent and child at home or in the classroom with children playing in pairs, in small groups or with the whole class being divided into four or five teams. So why not grab an old deck of playing cards and start playing.

 

By: Teresa Evans

Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com

 Teresa Evans is a teacher and parent who uses fun math games to get kids excited about math. To receive your own seven part math games collection visit Making Math More Fun.

So there you have it! What do you think? Some fun card games that will help your student learn math!

 

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Can Math Make Beautiful Designs?

Sure it can!

Check out the video below to see some beautiful patterns that numbers can be used to create!

Learn Fun Math Patterns on a Number Wheel: Threes & Sevens
rightBrainMath.com

This video uses a number line bent into a circle for the ones-digits. Skip Counting around the circle by Threes reveal a fancy ten pointed star. Right Brain Math Patterns reveal that when you skip count around the circle by Sevens, you reveal the same star. All the numbers that add up to ten the Ones and Nines, the Twos and Eights, the Threes and Sevens, and the Fours and Sixes create the same image on the number wheel. The video shows the factor set of the Threes and Sevens but concentrates on the Ones-digits. Right Brain Math uses the patterns that are built in, inherent, in numbers to create overviews as well as factor sets and individual multiplication facts. It is a fun, easy way to learn multiplication. Right Brain Maths book, EZ Times Table is considered revolutionary way to introduce Math by Curriculum Review magazine.

rightBrainMath.com

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Very Cool – eh?

 

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Math at Easter-Time

The holidays can be lots of fun for children. Not just because they get candy and gifts, but because they also get off from school!

But just because they’re off from school, doesn’t mean that you can’t still help them learn math!

Teresa Evans wrote a nice article for ezinearticles.com which helps you take advantage of Easter and teach your children math while still making it fun.

Easter Math Is Fun Math

Easter is an exciting time for kids. But the good thing is that you can use that excitement to help kids develop their math skills. Turning regular math into Easter math makes math much, much more exciting. You can use Easter math games or Easter Brain Teasers and the kids will beg you for more.

Below are some simple ways that you use Easter math in the classroom or at home.

Bunny Hop
Here is a simple Easter math game that you can use to practice any basic math skill. You start by selecting a start line and a finish line. Next two children compete to jump from the start to the finish by taking two bunny hops every time they answer a question correctly. You can use any questions that help kids to practice the skill that you want. For example you could ask ‘6 times 8’, ‘half of 34’ or ‘What is the number before 87’? The first child to answer correctly takes two jumps and the first one to reach the finish line is the winner.

Easter Counting
You may know the old favorite counting game Buzz. But did you know that you can easily turn this into an Easter math game by replacing the word ‘Buzz’ with an Easter word. Try using ‘Bunny’ or ‘Easter Egg’ instead. The kids sit in a circle and count around a circle but replace the number 7, each multiple of 7 and every number containing a 7 digit with the word ‘Bunny’. If a child says the number instead of saying ‘Bunny’ they are out.

This is a tricky game that requires concentration and a good knowledge of multiples. You can also try playing it with other digits instead of 7. For example, you could use 5 or 10 for an easier version or use 8 or 9 to make a more challenging version.

Easter Brain Teasers
Brain teasers are a great way to get kids thinking math. Many number problems can also be made a lot more interesting by using Easter as a theme for the problem. Here are a few that you can start with.

The Easter Bunny has 15 Easter Eggs in a Basket. He gives our 3 then collects 7 more then gives 6 children 2 eggs each. How many eggs in the basket now?
You can easily change the numbers in this one and then have a completely new problem to present.

Tom has been dyeing eggs. He used green and red dye. If he has dyed 17 eggs and he has 5 more red eggs than green eggs. How many eggs does he have of each color?

How many eggs did I find in the Egg Hunt? I found between 10 and 30. The number is divisible by 4 but not by 7 or 8. I found an even number of eggs.

There are many different ways to use Easter math get kids adding, multiplying, comparing and using other math skills. You’ll find that kids will definitely agree that Easter makes math loads more fun.

Terese Evans is a teacher and parent who uses games to get kids excited about learning. She shares her favorite Kids Easter Activities including Easter worksheets, board games, card games and game sheets at http://www.kids-easter-activities.com. You can receive your own printable Easter Activities for Kids when you visit http://www.kids-easter-activities.com.

While the kids may all agree, I know that I certainly do too!

Have a great Springtime and Easter (if you celebrate it)!

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