Tag: Gratuity

Using Math During The Holidays

With the holidays coming upon us, and knowing that many people eat out during the holidays, I thought it would be nice to make a post which discusses how to use math and make the appropriate tip after eating or drinking. I found a nice article on this topic at articledashboard.com. Check it out!

How To Tip At US Restaurants And Bars

Tipping culture is rife in US restaurants, and it is an important custom for those working in the service industry. It’s become so ingrained that there are well-known consequences for skimping on gratuity. Failing to tip a bartender after each round of drinks, for example, well, it wouldn’t happen. After not tipping the first time, you’re not going to get another round. Here is a guide to tipping in restaurants and bars during your US travels.

If you get up and order your drinks at the bar the standard tip is one dollar per drink. For cocktails or specialty requests, such as a Boston sour with egg white, an extra buck is preferred for the time it takes to make these drinks. Custom dictates that after purchasing the drinks, you leave the tip on the bar. Don’t hand it directly to the bartender, especially if it is busy. They will see it and pick it up. If you see a few dollars on the bar, leave them. Those are tips from other customers. If you don’t have a lot of change on you, you can tip the bartender a larger sum after the first round which will cover the next few, just remember to return to the same one when ordering.

When settling a bar tab, you can calculate 20% of the total to determine the appropriate tip. Most won’t show the amount of drinks you’ve ordered, but the amount should come to about the same. If you want better service, tip more (a few dollars extra is all it takes). If you’ve bought drinks at restaurants with your meal that the waitperson has brought to you, the bartender will receive a percentage of the total tip that you leave with your bill. If there is a bouncer on the door of a club you regularly frequent, tip them a few bucks for future perks. They do remember.

At restaurants, 15 to 20% is the standard, left after the bill has been paid on the table. If paying by card, a tip can be added on the receipt. If you’re terrible at math, doubling the tax and rounding up is roughly correct. Tipping more is always encouraged, but tipping less is an insult. If you receive bad service, ask to speak with a manager rather than throwing a few coins down. In fact, no tip sends a stronger message than a measly dollar or two. For large parties, gratuity is usually included in the total. It will say so at the bottom of your bill.

Many tourists are against the tipping culture, but it’s important to follow customs in a host country. People in the service industry receive low wages, sometimes below minimum, so tips make up a large portion of their take home earnings. Minimum wage is also not a livable income in most areas, and workers in the industry are largely considered casual, meaning they are not provided with any benefits such as health insurance, sick pay, or even holiday leave. A few good tips can mean a doctor’s visit or a paid utility bill.

By: Anna Woodward

Fresno restaurants can satisfy the whole family. To help you choose the right one for a night out, visit: www.myyp.com

 Personally, I usually leave a 20% tip. And remember that the tip is calcualted before the tax is added in. To do that, just take the total and multuply it by 2 and drop the last digit! So a $25 meal would render a (25 x 2 = 50)  $5 tip.

Hope that helps!

Have yourself great holiday season!

 

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Mental Math – Tricks or Real Help

Mental Math  – is it a trick or can it truly help your child to learn math?

I found this article from article dashboard and wanted to share it with you. It discusses 2 methods that are currently being used in Asia.

Mental Math Methods From Asia

First of all, let us figure out what exactly is mental math. Today if you search the phrase “mental math” you will probably end up with millions of options. Not exactly that makes your life easy; instead it builds up and strengthens your curiosity. Put in simplest terms, mental math can be defined as calculations performed in your head – mentally – without help of any external device be it as simple as pen and paper or any modern day device such as calculator, computer or any other electronic gadget.

We humans perform mental mathematical calculations everyday, consciously and unconsciously. When you are driving you figure out when to apply brakes to bring the vehicle to stop before hitting something. You figure out time difference between east coast and west coast. But where we falter is at the simplest and most mundane of calculations. Go to a restaurant and figure out 18% gratuity.

Abacus Mental Mathematics

What is abacus mental mathematics? Origin of Abacus is highly disputed today, some say it originated in Mesopotamia and some claim to be in China. Over centuries, abacus has evolved in to various different forms and sizes. The most commonly used is the Japanese Soroban Abacus.

The Soroban Abacus consists of one upper row and four lower rows and columns vary from thirteen, fifteen, seventeen or twenty one. It is claimed and proven by many researchers in Asia that Abacus stimulates whole brain development. When children use both hands to move the abacus beads to perform arithmetic calculations, there is quick communication between the hands and the brain that stimulates both the right and left hemispheres of the brain. This promotes rapid, balanced whole brain development.

If a child starts learning the abacus before being taught traditional arithmetic, there is minimal conflict and the child will easily work within both systems. If a child starts the program later, having already received traditional foundations, there may be a slightly extended learning period for the child to accept and integrate the abacus method.

Vedic Mental Mathematics

What is Vedic mental mathematics? Origin of Vedic Mathematics is in Atharva Veda (Holy Scripture from Hinduism). Vedic mathematics is a system based on sixteen sutras (aphorisms) which are actually word-formulae describing natural ways of solving a whole range of mathematical problems. These formulae describe the way the mind naturally works and are therefore a great help in directing the student to the appropriate method of solution.

It is claimed and proven by many researchers in Asia that practice and use of Vedic mathematics helps the person in many different aspects of decision making. From intelligent guessing to thinking outside the box ability. Vedic mathematics has its applications to much advanced mathematics, such as calculus and linear algebra. The sixteen sutras are: By one more than the one before, All from 9 and the last from 10, Vertically and crosswise, Transpose and apply, If the Samuccaya is the same it is zero, If one is in ratio the other is zero, By addition and by subtraction, By the completion or non-completion, Differential calculus, By the deficiency, Specific and general, The remainders by the last digit, The ultimate and twice the penultimate, By one less than the one before, The product of the sum, and All the multipliers

Today, both these methods have made a come back in Asia. Abacus Mental Math method is extremely popular in nations of China, Taiwan, Japan, Malaysia, Korea and India whereas Vedic Mental Math method is extremely popular only in India.

By: Shilpa Rao

Shilpa Rao is an experienced mental math tutor. Learn more about abacus math and vedic math

So it appears that mental math can truly help your child.

What do you think?

 

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