Tag: Math Class

Math Games For Summer

Summer time is a time of care-free fun for children. A time when there are no tests, no homework and no school thoughts at all! However, it shouldn’t be a time for your child to lose 3 months of math development! So to make the math retention a little more palatable for your young one, I did a little research and found some games that you might consider purchasing and helping your child retain some of that valuable information that they learned in math class throughout the previous school year.

Some of these are great for the portable hand-held games that children like so much. And the nice thing is that you can get used games for a very reasonable price.

So check these out and see if there is something that your child would like.

Kids Learn Math: A+ Edition
publisher: Talking Stick Games
ASIN: B005DXG5GC
EAN: 0859462001007
sales rank: 3136
price: $11.99 (new), $11.69 (used)

Improve your grades with Learn Math – A+ Edition as your personal coach! Practice with exercises ranging from 5 to 20 rounds each as well as a variety of mini-games all focused on grades 1 through 4, featuring 5 categories that contain a total of 15 mini-games.

 

Math Blaster Prime Adventure NDS
publisher: Majesco Sales Inc., published: 2009-05-26
ASIN: B001FEO71S
EAN: 0096427015659
sales rank: 9468
price: $4.33 (new), $3.25 (used)

Features include:

•Practice math facts with the portability and easy-to-use touchscreen of NDS
•Stay interested with fast action and the Blaster narrative
•Experience the challenge of mastering 20 levels and three difficulty modes
•Play alone or go head-to-head with up to three friends
•Learn to perform math functions faster and with improved accuracy

Junior Brain Trainer Math
publisher: Maximum Games, published: 2011-03-02
ASIN: B0042RAX90
EAN: 0814290010423
sales rank: 11109
price: $9.38 (new), $7.49 (used)

The math game that is both fun and rewarding! Designed for children aged 6-12, Junior Brain Trainer Math Edition helps kids improve their math skills while challenging them with exciting games and puzzles. Make learning fun again with the game that keeps kids on their toes and eager to achieve higher goals!

Learn Math
publisher: DreamCatcher Games, published: 2010-03-01
ASIN: B001IK577C
EAN: 0625904717917
sales rank: 15933
price: $44.58 (new), $7.33 (used)

Numbers and calculations can be fun! Take your lessons “to go” on your Nintendo DS with Learn Math. Progress through 10 different topics to learn, practice, and repeat lessons based on a syllabus for grades 1-4. Become a math wizard in no time!

Math Blaster for 5th Grade
publisher: Knowledge Adventure
ASIN: B0007RQY0Q
EAN: 0051581024213
sales rank: 36920
price: $0.23 (used)

over 4000 word problems that help critical thinking skills – 3 levels

These all look like great games that will keep your child’s brain working over the summer and maybe help develop them a little more to get them ready for the coming school year!

Did you know that we offer summer classes at Mathnasium of Cherry Hill? Please call us at (856) 874-0050 for more info.

Have a great day!

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Math Anxiety

Does your child have math anxiety? Or maybe you have math anxiety! What is math anxiety?

I’m glad you asked!

So here is an excellent article all about math anxiety and some of the myths that people believe about math.

Check it out, it’s an interesting read.

Math Anxiety: Shattering The 5 Myths

Students who say they suffer from “math anxiety” usually have the following symptoms: Upon entering their math classroom, even on the first day, they panic and feel immediately unsuccessful. Feelings of nervousness, frustration, annoyance, even anger are felt. Even when offered help or opportunities to get assistance, the student remains passive and afraid. On tests these students feel like they are alone in their suffering; that they are the only ones who are struggling; that they will mess up even the simplest problems. These students have lost their confidence, and have often felt this way for many years. What is perpetuating this problem, and what can parents and teachers do about this?

The problem of math anxiety is universal. Yes, many students come to class with skill gaps in the curriculum and poor training in study and test-taking skills. But it is mostly a mental block and self-fulfilling prophecy perpetuated by those who care for the struggling student the most: parents, relatives, and teachers who show a negative attitude about their past challenges in math class. The clue to the power of the self-imposed block is when the student travels to his next class and immediately feels better and more confident, and is glad the torturous hour of math is over. For most kids with math anxiety, this is the reality. Why the sudden relief, the sense of going back to normal, and the instant sense that things are better?

Math anxiety is simply an emotional condition, extended through many days, weeks, and years and blown up in the student’s mind as being something unrecoverable, innate, and permanent. One of the first steps in dealing with this strong emotion is to examine the myths about math in general that create mistaken ideas about how math concepts and ideas fit in to our world.

Math Myth #1: Only the lucky few are born with math ability
We all accept the fact that some people are born with the right type of body, skills, and athletic ability to become professional athletes, right? Does this mean that those of us who are not “naturally gifted” athletically shouldn’t try to play tennis, join a softball team, throw the football? Of course not. The difference is one of degree. Sports still can play an active part of our lives, in fact should be important to all of us for reasons of health and social and emotional well being.

If a student feels they are not talented in calculations, “getting numbers”, or thinking mathematically, do they just give up? No — and it obviously leads to a discussion of learning to persevere the obstacles and challenges in our career as students, not quit when the going gets tough.

Math Myth #2: There is only one answer, and this is the goal of mathematics
Sure, at the simplest levels of calculation there has to be a unique answer: 2 X 4 has to be only 8. As we move on to upper, more important levels of mathematics, these memorized calculations are only tools to get at the true goals in the realm of math: learning how to measure and analyze our world, and solve problems using mathematical tools. Again, I would argue that when solving systems of equations (simultaneous), there must be only one solution. But this is just learning the tool; the process of solving such a problem is a procedure that becomes a higher level strategy to solve even more complicated situations. An experienced math teacher or professor should delight in students who can show creative ways of solving problems different from the way it is shown in the textbook. The key is to use math skills and algorithms to practice your thinking abilities, and improve them!

Math Myth #3: Girls are not good at math, and shouldn’t pursue math-related careers
Although this idea has faded a bit in recent generations, the idea that girls can’t think mathematically is still out there at the family dinner table, school classrooms, and hallways. Of course, the female brain is wired differently than the male one, but mathematical ability remains one that has to be practiced and nurtured over time, regardless of gender.

At the typical family gathering, do people laughingly admit that they are illiterate, and have always struggled with reading? Probably not, yet there seems to be some camaraderie when someone mentions their challenges in math class. It tends to be accepted as normal, and anyone, especially a girl who thrives mathematically must be unusually talented. There is also no truth to the rumor that girls are somehow less feminine if they enjoy math or excel in it.

Math Myth #4: Success in math means you can get the answers instantly
At the earlier grades, when learning addition facts or multiplication tables, of course speed is important. These are the building block skills necessary at the foundational level. In the middle school or high school classrooms where the faster thinkers are celebrated or minimal time is allotted for slower learners to respond, this just shows poor teaching. A good instructor should allow time for exploring other solutions and finding alternate methods.
In fact, an effective math lesson needs to celebrate creative problem solving. This involves conversation, brainstorming, and group discussion. Another argument for possibly women being more suited to higher levels of mathematics!

Math Myth #5: Math literacy can be avoided and is not important
Again, the scene centers on your dinner table. . . If you mention your struggles with yesterday’s math lesson or bad score on a quiz, the stories come out again. Knowing nods of sympathy, and opinions about how only some people are gifted enough. You hear comments about how you just need to get through it in order to graduate and then you can spend your time doing more “important” work. The implications are, of course, that math is something to endure, not something to learn to improve on and even enjoy.
The idea of math literacy is an important one. Few people argue that everyone needs to be able to read and write, but there is the fuzzy notion that mathematical competence is optional. If a student does well in Algebra classes in high school, studies have shown that they will far excel in college experiences and be more successful in life. This represents a minimal competency landmark. Everyone should strive at the least to pass algebra classes in high school and college as a jump-start for further success in the academic and working world.
The algebraic skills of creating
abstract representations of problems and solving them (equations, graphs, proofs, and hypothetical models) is extremely important in life. Whether researching the best place to order carpet, construct an addition for the house, or do a cost-analysis for your business, mathematical skills, mathematical thinking and strategies are involved.

Overcoming math anxiety in children and adults is more about being aware of the myths and personal biases of other people’s beliefs. Solving this challenge is not putting more time into studying or banging your head against the wall in your study area. Mathematics is a competency area in school that signals your readiness to enter the working and academic world and be successful. It is not optional, magical, or impossible. It takes perseverance, patience, and a willingness to seek out help. Many times, math anxiety becomes math avoidance, supported by the ignorance of close friends and family, but it can be overcome!

In part 2 of this article series, I examine how to deal with homework issues as they relate to a student who is feeling math anxiety. I will answer the challenges of what to do when a student feels like he can’t understand the textbook, doesn’t know how to even get through last night’s homework, and can’t organize for the next day or ask for help. Knowing how to deal with homework sessions for the parents and student is the first step in finding the cure for this common problem.

By: Terry VanNoy

Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com

Terry VanNoy’s class sessions, Math with Mr. V are by appointment only . . . Call toll free 1-877-317-3317 to arrange a free consultation! Help your child feel more successful in his or her math classroom.

So are you feeling better about that math anxiety now!?!?

Have a great day!

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How To Make Learning Math Easy

Most of the time when you ask a child about learning math, they’ll usually respond that it’s hard. Some respond that they’re just not good at math. But did you know that with you’re help, you can make it a little easier for them to learn math? Yes, you can! Check out this article that James Tomas wrote.

Making Math Easy

 Math can be a difficult subject for many children, and often, children struggle in school simply because they do not understand the basic concepts of mathematics. If your child is struggling with this subject, and you want some suggestions for help on math, then you have come to the right place. If you take a proactive approach to your child’s learning needs, you can make math much easier for them. Just consider the following suggestions.

First, remember that school subjects are often considered not fun or even boring. Your child may be struggling with math simply because he or she feels like being in math class is torment. To get your child more interested in the subjects, look for ways to make it fun. Create math based games that will be exciting learning experiences. This is a good way to keep a child’s attention and help them learn without them feeling the normally drudgery of study.

Second, math can easily be taught in everyday situations. You do not have to sit down with a child at a kitchen table to study the subject. When your child needs help on math, look for real life scenarios to help them learn. For example, take them along to the grocery store and let them use a notepad to add up the cost of different grocery items that you are buying. When you purchase something at a convenience store, have the child try to determine how much change you got back from your cash payment. There are many real life scenarios that can easily implement help on math for your child.

Third, remember that illustrating something or making it hands on is a much easier way for children to learn. If you put a math problem on paper, the child may struggle. However, if you make it come to life, they may find it easier to learn. For instance, on a basic level, have the child add or subtract actual items like fruit in the kitchen, books or videos in the living room, or pebbles in the back yard. Bringing math to life gives a better illustration for a child to learn.

Many children struggle with math. If your child needs help on math, remember that you can give them that help. Just keep in mind that you need to make the subject more fun and interesting. You also need to use real life scenarios and illustrations to teach them the subject.

By: James Tomas

Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com

Making Math Easy is one of the subjects from the “Education and Reference” category of eCapsulate.com.

 

So you now know what to do to take some of the difficulty out of learning math for your children!

Hope you have a great day!

 

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Preparing For The Math Final Exam

At this time of the year a student should be getting ready for their final exams. Hopefully your student won’t be dreading their math final! With that thought in mind, I was reading an article on helping your child or student to prepare for their tests. It’s a pretty good article so I thought I’d share it with you. So here it is:

Math Anxiety: Overcoming Test Fear

 

In previous articles in this series, I have discussed the math myths our society has extended, and how these misconceptions affect how kids approach the learning challenges in math class. Also, overcoming this anxiety when completing assignments at home is essential in coping with the emotional block of thinking the student “can’t get it” and will “never get it”.

It has been said before that to truly conquer your fear, you must put a name to it and understand it. On many levels, the anxiety that students feel walking in to a math test situation becomes irrational. The honest concerns they may have had about the classroom material that will show up on the test get blown up to major emotional blocks that understandably affect their performance. To ease the intensity of this perception, it is essential to really understand what has led up this point. With the help of parents, classroom teacher, online tutor (any patient listener will do!), students must think about when this problem started. What has happened in the past to form the belief that the fear is insurmountable, unsolvable? What have the true results been on past tests, in other curriculum areas? What steps has the student taken to deal with the problem?

As mentioned in the other parts to this article series, contributing factors are the myths and misconceptions people have about math in general. This is a cultural, societal bias that seems to be more prevalent in math than in other areas of study. Unfortunately, students grow up immersed in this unfriendly environment and start to believe the math myths. Again, with help from a sympathetic listener, students over time should come to realize that fear about math class and math tests are irrational. Concern and nervousness about an upcoming test is normal and can be dealt with. Keeping the anxiety level at a controllable level is the first step to being ready for their upcoming exam.

The next building block to overcoming test anxiety in math class is to be prepared. Of course, this is common sense advice, but it gets forgotten if the student has elevated this concern from a “I’m not ready” level to a “I can’t do it” or “I’ll never get it” level.

In the second article of this series I discussed how to deal with homework issues. If students have improved their use of homework time and maintained higher quality standards for their assignments, they will be better prepared for tests. If they have not been doing their homework because of “math avoidance”, test environments will continue to be a huge challenge.
Given that students are able to dissipate the stress level by understanding their fear, and they have put in the effort on homework, now what can they do on test day? Using smart test-taking strategies is the final piece of the puzzle.

To be a more effective test-taker, students must be able to use the time given effectively. Looking at the clock and worrying about the time will just add to the anxiety level. Here are some suggestions:

1. Take the time to look over the entire test in the first 5 minutes to get a sense of what concepts are covered and what format the test uses.
2. Mark up the easiest problems and the hardest problems.
3. Do the easiest problems first in order to gain confidence.
4. Get to the average level problems next, keeping in mind to move on if feeling stuck.
5. Save the hardest ones for last.
6. Finally, try the ones you skipped. Use smart guessing strategies only as a last resort. Proofread for small mistakes.
7. Feel proud that you did your best!

Students need to be physically prepared to sit down at a test and do their best. Drink adequate water the day before, and bring a water bottle at the test site to stay properly hydrated. The day before the test and the morning of test day, students should have eaten nutritious, high energy foods without too much sugar and salt. (Potato chips and corn chips, high sugar and caffeine drinks are never a good idea!) The student should have had plenty of sleep the night before, also.

As students get ready leading up to the test, they must find out what other resources they are allowed during the test. Will the teacher allow notebooks, note cards, past assignments, or study sheets or problem examples? If so, get them organized and ready; reread or rewrite them as necessary. Work with other students in study groups, or use an online tutor and discuss examples similar to the ones you think will be on the test. This preparation time and effort will pay off!

Math fear is a common experience for all of us. What is not common, however, is letting it handcuff us to the point of freezing up and blocking our ability to solve the problem for ourselves. Suffering in isolation is not the answer; avoiding the subject cannot work; not seeking help won’t get rid of the problem, either. By discussing with others who can listen, students can eventually understand that math anxiety is common and solvable. Using intelligent strategies when doing homework, and putting in the effort to prepare for tests will result in increased self-confidence and overcoming the fear of math.

By: Terry VanNoy

Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com

Struggling in your math class? Wanting to get ahead and boost your grades and self-confidence? Personal, private, and focused online math tutoring in a customized learning environment. Click here to see a demonstration of my online classroom

If you’re in the Cherry Hill NJ area Mathnasium of Cherry Hill would love to help your child or student prepare for their final math exam. Please give us a call!

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Your Teen Can Learn Math

If you have a teenager at home this article is for you!

Teach Teens The Importance Of Math Every Day

Math can be a challenging subject for students, but it is vital for their futures. Statistics show that strong math skills can increase success after high school, regardless of teens’ career goals or plans for higher education.

While most teens believe math is important for achieving their career goals, a national survey by Texas Instruments has found that only half are planning to take additional math classes beyond their schools’ minimum requirements.

So how do parents convince their children to do more than the minimum in math?

Show Them They Use Math Every Day…Really

Teens already are using math in daily life, although they may not know it. Here are just a few examples:

• Figuring out how many more minutes you can talk on your cell phone this month without going over your contract? Divide X number of minutes by Y number of days left in the month, and you get how many minutes per day can be used. Welcome to Algebra 101.

• Buying a car? You will have to adjust the length of the loan and interest rates to find the monthly payment that will fit your budget. And don’t forget to figure in gas, maintenance and insurance.

• Driving your car? Estimating distances, judging acceleration rates and calculating how late you can sleep and still reach your class on time all require math skills.

If teens recognize how math can improve their lives outside of the classroom, they just might be more likely to challenge themselves in the classroom.

Require Four Years Of Math

Taking at least one math class every year in high school can increase the number of opportunities for teens, whether their plans lead to college or directly into the workforce.

Just consider these statistics from the United States Department of Education:

• High school students who complete math classes beyond Algebra 2, such as trigonometry or precalculus, are more likely to go to college-and earn their degrees twice as fast-as those with a less rigorous math education.

• People with strong math backgrounds are more likely to be employed and earn more, even if they have not gone to college.

Math skills are essential to success, regardless of the teen’s goals.

Demonstrate How Math Can Be Rewarding And Fun

Math is all around us and an exciting part of everyday life. Scientists use it to find cures for diseases, musicians use it to compose songs and entrepreneurs use it to manage their businesses.

Providing teens with ways to relate math to their lives and future career plans will help them to understand its importance.

One program that mixes entertainment with education is Texas Instruments’ We All Use Math Every Day™, which provides free classroom activities online that help students explore the math derived from the concepts highlighted in each episode of CBS’ “Numb3rs.” Developed by mathematicians and educators, the activities focus on high school level math. Thousands of educators are downloading the classroom activities on a weekly basis and more than 35,000 have signed up for the Teacher Kits, inspiring more than 4 million students to become more engaged and interested in math.

By: Stacey Moore

Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com

Visit www.cbs.com/numb3rs to learn how your teen can benefit from the program and encourage your child’s math teacher to check out the activities as well. It is important for parents to engage their children in math and teach them the value of a strong math education. By working with teens to show how math is relevant every day, parents can help ensure their children’s personal and professional success.

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Learning Math with the Abacus

abacus

So you’ve all seen an abacus, right?

I thought you might be interested in knowing a little about its history and how it’s used.

So I looked for an article that would do just that and found this one!

Learning Math With Manipulatives — The Abacus

The abacus has been around in various forms for over 2300 years. It was used for various counting and operational tasks. One might even call it the original math manipulative (unless you count fingers and stones). In my younger years, abaci were relegated to the bottom shelf or used as a toy for the kinesthetic kids. These days, abaci can meet the same fate that the abaci of my youth did. The first known abacus, the Salamis tablet, collected dust for over 2100 years. For all those lonely and banished abaci on dusty shelves everywhere, I dedicate this article on how to represent, add and subtract whole and decimal numbers.

As most teachers know, the use of manipulatives by younger elementary students helps them to understand the concepts of place value and operations later on. In my search for a variety of manipulatives to teach number sense, addition and subtraction, I came across a convenient tool in the abacus. I’m sure it was no coincidence that each row on the abacus included exactly ten beads, but there was no operators manual with the abacus I found. When I found an instruction manual several years later, I found that the manufacturer of the abacus saw it as no more than a counting device and had no idea of the place value power inherent in the design.

Representing Numbers With a Dusty Abacus

When I first started using an abacus as a manipulative in math class, I was teaching grade six. In the grade six curriculum, students were supposed to represent whole numbers greater that one million and decimal numbers to thousandths. If you count the number of places from one million down to thousandths, you get ten places. Coincidentally, the abacus had ten rods of ten beads each. I’m sure what I discovered was discovered long ago, and some manufacturers probably even send out better instruction manuals that make note of this, but at the time, it was a completely new discovery.

To make a long story short, I assigned each row a specific place value starting with millions at the top, and thousandths at the bottom. One could use a strip of tape or an indelible marker to label the rows. To represent a number, a student would simply move the number of beads for the value of each place in the number they were given. For example, the number 325,729 was represented by moving three of the hundred thousands beads, two of the ten thousands beads, five of the thousands beads, seven of the hundreds beads, two of the tens beads and nine of the ones beads.

I didn’t have a class set of abaci, so I made up little sketches of an abacus (six or so per page) and students showed representations of numbers using these.

Adding and Subtracting Numbers With a Polished Abacus

Once students are familiar with representing numbers using an abacus, they can move onto adding and subtracting numbers. The idea of adding using an abacus and place value is quite a simple process. Begin by representing the first number. Add the value of each place value in the second and subsequent numbers one at a time beginning with the lowest place value and regroup as necessary.

Consider this simple example, 178 + 255. The student would represent 178 on the abacus to begin. She would then add five to the ones row. Since there aren’t five more beads to add, this first move would also involve regrouping. The student would move the two remaining ones, then regroup by sliding all ten ones back and replacing them with a ten. She would then move three more beads since she already moved two of them for a total of five. Since there was some regrouping, there would now be eight tens. The students needs to add five more, so there would be another regrouping, this time of ten tens to make a hundred. Finally, the student moves two additional hundred beads; this time regrouping isn’t necessary. If everything was done correctly, the student would end up with four hundreds beads, three tens beads and three ones beads.

A variation on addition is to add the second and subsequent numbers from the highest place value to the lowest place value.

Subtracting is much the same as addition, but it involves “removing” beads. The procedure for subtracting is to represent the first number then to subtract the value of each place value in the second and subsequent numbers beginning with the highest place value.

Consider this example, 3.252 – 1.986. The student would first represent 3.252 using the abacus. He would begin by subtracting one one. This is fairly straight forward because there are enough ones available. In the next step, though, the student has to subtract nine tenths from two tenths. He begins by subtracting two of the nine tenths, but he then has to regroup one of the remaining ones into ten tenths. Once he has ten more tenths, he can subtract the remaining seven tenths. He continues by subtracting eight hundredths from five hundredths, and again, he has to regroup, this time, one of the tenths into ten hundredths. The final step also involves regrouping since six thousandths must be subtracted from two thousandths. In the end, the student hopefully ends up with one one, two tenths, six hundredths, and six thousandths (1.266).

Subtraction could also be accomplished by subtracting the lowest place value first, but this sometimes means more manipulations of the beads which means more chance for error.

Conclusion

The use of the abacus takes a little bit of time to master. It is important that the teacher and the students use the correct place value terminology (e.g. “regroup ten hundreds to make one thousand” instead of “turn ten green beads into one blue bead”), so the concepts of place value, addition, and subtraction can be transfered to mental strategies and paper/pencil algorithms. Remember, the best way to dust and polish an abacus is with little fingers!

By: Peter Waycik – Peter Waycik is an elementary teacher and a reading specialist. He supplies thousands of free math worksheets to teachers and parents every day at www.math-drills.com.  He also runs www.edarticle.com where you can find information on a variety of education topics.

So are you ready to go buy an abacus!?!?

Hope you have a great day.

 

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Math Really Can Be Easy

So many children as well as adults seem to believe that math is a hard subject to master. But as this article explains, it doesn’t have to be that way! Check it out and try some of the suggestions. I’m sure you’ll find it’s not so hard for your child to learn math!

Making Math Easy

Math can be a difficult subject for many children, and often, children struggle in school simply because they do not understand the basic concepts of mathematics. If your child is struggling with this subject, and you want some suggestions for help on math, then you have come to the right place. If you take a proactive approach to your child’s learning needs, you can make math much easier for them. Just consider the following suggestions.

First, remember that school subjects are often considered not fun or even boring. Your child may be struggling with math simply because he or she feels like being in math class is torment. To get your child more interested in the subjects, look for ways to make it fun. Create math based games that will be exciting learning experiences. This is a good way to keep a child’s attention and help them learn without them feeling the normally drudgery of study.

Second, math can easily be taught in everyday situations. You do not have to sit down with a child at a kitchen table to study the subject. When your child needs help on math, look for real life scenarios to help them learn. For example, take them along to the grocery store and let them use a notepad to add up the cost of different grocery items that you are buying. When you purchase something at a convenience store, have the child try to determine how much change you got back from your cash payment. There are many real life scenarios that can easily implement help on math for your child.

Third, remember that illustrating something or making it hands on is a much easier way for children to learn. If you put a math problem on paper, the child may struggle. However, if you make it come to life, they may find it easier to learn. For instance, on a basic level, have the child add or subtract actual items like fruit in the kitchen, books or videos in the living room, or pebbles in the back yard. Bringing math to life gives a better illustration for a child to learn.

Many children struggle with math. If your child needs help on math, remember that you can give them that help. Just keep in mind that you need to make the subject more fun and interesting. You also need to use real life scenarios and illustrations to teach them the subject.

By: James Tomas

Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com

Making Math Easy is one of the subjects from the “Education and Reference” category of eCapsulate.com.

There you have it. Give some of these a try and let me know what you think?

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Simplify To Make Math Easy

Here’s an article on one of my favorite subjects – making math easy.

Making Math Easy

Math can be a difficult subject for many children, and often, children struggle in school simply because they do not understand the basic concepts of mathematics. If your child is struggling with this subject, and you want some suggestions for help on math, then you have come to the right place. If you take a proactive approach to your child’s learning needs, you can make math much easier for them. Just consider the following suggestions.

First, remember that school subjects are often considered not fun or even boring. Your child may be struggling with math simply because he or she feels like being in math class is torment. To get your child more interested in the subjects, look for ways to make it fun. Create math based games that will be exciting learning experiences. This is a good way to keep a child’s attention and help them learn without them feeling the normally drudgery of study.

Second, math can easily be taught in everyday situations. You do not have to sit down with a child at a kitchen table to study the subject. When your child needs help on math, look for real life scenarios to help them learn. For example, take them along to the grocery store and let them use a notepad to add up the cost of different grocery items that you are buying. When you purchase something at a convenience store, have the child try to determine how much change you got back from your cash payment. There are many real life scenarios that can easily implement help on math for your child.

Third, remember that illustrating something or making it hands on is a much easier way for children to learn. If you put a math problem on paper, the child may struggle. However, if you make it come to life, they may find it easier to learn. For instance, on a basic level, have the child add or subtract actual items like fruit in the kitchen, books or videos in the living room, or pebbles in the back yard. Bringing math to life gives a better illustration for a child to learn.

Many children struggle with math. If your child needs help on math, remember that you can give them that help. Just keep in mind that you need to make the subject more fun and interesting. You also need to use real life scenarios and illustrations to teach them the subject.

By: James Tomas

Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com

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Overcome Math Homework Fear

As your child begins to learn math and they are given homework, YOUR attitude and help will aid them in overcoming any math homework fears that they may have.
Terry Van Noy wrote a very good article which I’m sharing with you in order to help you and your child overcome their math homework fears.

Math Anxiety: Solving The Homework Hurdle 

 

A very common obstacle to any student’s success with their math class is allowing math fear to affect how they handle homework assignments. When it comes to the point of a student thinking they can’t understand even the simplest lessons in class, it translates to some unproductive time at the kitchen table during homework time. What is a parent to do if they see their child stare at the textbook and a blank homework paper, not knowing how to proceed? How do they overcome this emotional roadblock?

The condition commonly referred to as “math anxiety” or “math fear” can deeply affect how a student handles their required homework time. It should more accurately be labeled “math avoidance”. Human beings will always look to escape from things that feel uncomfortable, overly challenging, or even painful. But letting this habit fester over long periods of time creates a huge emotional block and affects school success, especially in math class. 

The very first strategy in helping your child deal with lack of success at the homework table is to explain the value of homework. Assuming the homework assignments given are not just busy work, are scaled to the appropriate level, and are reasonable in quantity (a large assumption, and the subject of another future article!), parents must explain that assignments are an extension of the lesson. The teacher can only go over a few examples, and must require the student to try a few more at home to solidify the concepts. A lot of self-learning happens when the student can take the time to explore the learning objectives on his own, and discover connections within the material.

Homework problems, if appropriate, are a chance to practice skills. Students start with simple examples to lock in the ideas, then should be able to move into more complicated examples. In doing so, a successful homework session can reinforce study habits and self-discipline. If students can finish an assignment regularly, they will feel the rewards of completing a task well done.

A critical key to helping your child become more successful with their homework time is to purposely establish consistency: in location, time, and quality.

Your son or daughter might argue about this, but you must insist their homework be done in the same location, on the same days and during the same time periods. This is a very important discussion to have with your child, but crucial in their success in school. Doing their assignments in front of the TV or behind closed doors in their bedroom is just going to prolong the agony. Establish a public place for the study session: the kitchen table, a side office, a comfortable chair in the living or dining room.

Talk about a regular homework routine: what times during the day and which days; working around family time and scheduled activities, of course. Children should be expected to bring home any assignments or projects they completed at school to show you. This eliminates the “I am already done with my homework” excuse. If finished, your son or daughter should be able to show you and celebrate their successful completion of the task. Reward such quality work, and it will become a habit.

Another aspect to homework consistency will be agreeing on the level of quality of your child’s homework activities. How complete do you expect assignments to be? How much time should you expect it to get completed? Don’t allow sloppy work; poor handwriting, incomplete math problems, a messy heading and missing parts of the assignment. This will require a call to the teacher to set expectations, but it will be well worth the effort.

If your student understands the reason his teacher assigns homework, and there is a consistent routine set up to get it done, the next step is to open up the communication possibilities. You can expect your child to become aware of how successful they are doing in their math class. Encourage them to be clear how to look up current grades, find out when the next exam happens, and when the teacher is available for help. If you can teach your student to be responsible for these communication lines, then your questions at night about their grades, assignments, and tests should be answered more regularly. Any hints about your child not knowing these things are symptoms of “math avoidance”. You want your child to deal with any current frustrations, not escape from them.

Also, do regular checkups about the quality of homework assignments. Ask every week to see the latest problem sets completed or test/quiz review sheets given out as study guides.

Always, of course, make adjustments to the time, place, and quality expected with your child’s homework. Ask the teacher about support opportunities, and spend the time to check everything your student son or daughter tells you. You won’t be sorry! 

By: Terry VanNoy

Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com 

: Struggling in your math class? Boost your grades and self-confidence. Click here to see a demonstration of my online classroom!

So there you have it! Some excellent suggestions on helping your child do well with their homework and overcoming their fear of math homework.
Until next time – Have a great day!

 

 

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