Tag: Multiplication Tables

Using Numbers To Help Your Child Learn Math

Mathematics without numbers just wouldn’t make sense, would it? Of course not – silly me!

🙂 In my daily reading I came across this article on using numbers to help your child become more proficient at learning and utilizing math. The article was written by Joseph Pinador and comes from Article Dashboard.

Home School Math Series: Number Counting

As a parent, helping your child perform better in their grade-level math is as easy as teaching number sense by practicing some basic exercises. Children who struggle with their grade-level math are deficient in operational skills. As a result, most of the problems that kids (and adults) have with math stem from a lack of basic number sense that comes with knowing how numbers naturally progress.

Traditionally, multiplication tables are taught in school. A better learning method is for students to count by numbers which is a more enjoyable activity then attempting to passively scan a table in a book.

The best and easiest exercise for teaching number sense is simply counting by numbers out loud. Knowing how numbers progress in this manner is essential to understanding the principles of division and multiplication. Counting by numbers can be done anywhere at any time and is actually most fun when done spontaneously.

While counting by the various numbers, you can ask your child questions about the activity. One example could be “Why is the number 5 so easy to count by?” (Hint: what number do you always end in when counting by 5’s?). Another question might be “What is unique about the sequence of numbers when counting by 9’s?” (Hint: look at how the numbers in the one’s and ten’s place are sequencing).

Use the numbers 2-12 for counting purposes. We do not need to go beyond the number 12 since these numbers tend to factor into all other numbers. Explain to your child that when we see that numbers repeat themselves, the numbers we are counting by are factors of those numbers. For example, when I count by 3’s or 5’s, I arrive at the number 15. Therefore, 3 and 5 are both factors of 15.

One variation of teaching number sense by number counting would be to use dice. Let your child roll the dice to see which number between 2 and 12 they are going to count by. Next, you roll to see how many times your child has to count by that number. Use your imagination to come up with your own counting games. As your child (and maybe even you) becomes more and more proficient at counting, raise the stakes by seeing how fast your child can count through all the numbers.

As your child is mastering this skill, they will see the connection between the number sense that is forming from this activity and the math operations it relates to. A multiplication problem is simply a fast way to add and the ability to count by numbers allows the child to use this skill to solve these problems quickly. With division problems, the child uses the factoring skills derived from number counting to see “how many of this number fits into that number”.

For children to attain proficiency at grade-level math, they must be able to perform basic math functions. Guiding your child towards learning basic number sense by number counting is the best place to start. For help in teaching number sense to your child please request a free, downloadable copy of my counting chart!

By: Joseph Pinador – For a free consultation regarding tutoring or home schooling for your child and a demonstration of my e-tutoring classroom, visit: www.tutorfi.com/joseph.

So now you know it’s as easy as learning number sense … makes sense right? (Sorry for the pun!)

Have a great day!

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Multiplication Table Tricks!

Here’s a great video that teaches you a trick for doing your 6x 6 through 10 x 10 multiplication tables!

Check it out!

Times tables using your hands!
Just a bit of fun! Use your hands to work out 6×6 to 10×10. Visit www.mathswrap.co.uk for real maths, tips and techniques.

So what do you think about that?

Pretty cool eh?

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Multiplication Tables Memorization Or Not

I found an interesting article with an alternative way of learning the multiplication tables. While it doesn’t cover all of the numbers, it does work for the numbers between 10 – 20. Check it out!

Memorizing The Multiplication Tables To 20 – That’s Just Crazy!

Do you have a child who needs a confidence-boost in school? Imagine if your child knew the multiplication tables up to 20. It would make him or her seem like a genius compared to most school children who have problems even remembering 7 x 8!

If you are like most people, you probably think that memorizing the times tables to twenty would be a heck of a chore. It would! It would be crazy!

I feel sorry for anyone who’s already done that when they read ahead and learn the method to get the answer to any multiplication problem with whole numbers between 10 and 20, fast, with no need for memorization. They would have saved weeks of boring, rote memorization if they used this method instead.

Here’s how you do it:

Let’s say you are multiplying 12 x 17.

Step 1) Add the ones column of either of those numbers to the other number. In this case you could add either 7 + 12 or 2 + 17. (Both would give you the same result, namely 19). Put a zero after it, to get 190.

Step 2) Get the product of the last digits of each of the original numbers (that would be 2 x 7, which would give you 14).

Step 3) Add the two numbers you got. In this case that would be 190 + 14. You’d get 204, and you’d be done, because 12 x 17 = 204.

That’s how easy it is, and it works for any numbers between 10 and 20!

Try 19 x 14.

1) 19 + 4 = 23. 23 with a zero at the end is 230.
2) 9 x 4 =36
3) 230 + 36 = 266, which is the correct answer. Piece of cake!

Please, please, please don’t ever write anything down when you do this! It wlll defeat the whole purpose of this method. Writing down things that a child’s mind should be able to do is like training yourself to use crutches when you don’t need them. The whole point of this is to trust your brain, and learn to do simple math mentally.

Here are some more examples. Once you have practiced them, you should become fast enough to amaze anyone, especially an elementary school teacher. A third-grader should be able to do these with ease in a short time, and become the “Einstein” of his or her class.

18 x 13
15 x 16
19 x 18
17 x 14
12 x 16

You may come across instances where you will have to carry. You will automatically understand how to do that if you pay attention.

Remember, you are trying to boost confidence, and you can’t do that unless you have the basics down. With the basic multiplication tables “in your bones,” this way to multiply numbers up to 20 can be a “reputation-maker.”

Of course, if you or someone you know (your child or student, maybe?) hasn’t totally mastered the “multiplication tables,” the above method won’t do you much good, will it? You’ll be happy to know that there is a fool-proof, easy way to teach or learn the basic times-tables in minutes, and it’s even easier than the the method for multiplication of 10 through 20. Learn to Multiply with this Easy Method, now.

By: Professor Homunculus

Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com

Brian Foley (a.k.a. “Professor Homunculus”) is the creator and web manager of Math Mojo and The Math Mojo Chronicles. He’s presented his Math and Magic programs at schools, corporations, and other facilities throughout the U.S. and Europe.

Try it out with your child and see how they like it?

Cheers!

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Mental Math and Your Child

Here’s a very interesting article I found on teaching your child mental math via the Vedic Math system. Makes for a very good read.

Homeschool Your Child To Vedic Math – The Worlds Fastest Mental Math System

Some questions to ponder:

– How could the Aryan civilization, near the Hunza Valley, 5,000 years ago, mentally compute mathematical operations that today only a calculator could achieve?

– And if the Math could not be done mentally, how could they do everything we know today, IN ONE-LINE? eg: converting the fraction 1/19 into a decimal is an 18 digit answer that requires 35 lines of exhausting long division, how could they do it in a one simple line solution?

– Why is NASA using this MENTAL ONE-LINE SYSTEM OF ARITHMETIC in the field of Advanced Artificial Intelligence? Why is INTEL using it in chip designing?

– How can your child become a Human Bio-Calculator?

– Is the current Western Math Curriculum keeping our Children in a state of limited intelligence?

You are home schooling your 14 year old teen in Math. You feel you can instill better values, character and education to your children. You want to give the Best to your child. You want to provide quality which is unattainable in schools. Imagine how your child would feel when he immediately realizes that you are teaching him powerful ways to do Math Calculations without any extra burden on the both of you. Infact he would now want you to take the Math Classes more often so that he gets a hang on to these new systems.

This system of teaching Math can complement your family’s strong learning system and can instill the values you want to develop in your child. It requires just knowledge of multiplication tables up to 9 to start learning it and it is easy to learn, Master and teach your child without being overwhelmed. Infact once you spend 2 minutes with your child on teaching him how to do this sum (shown here) he can at once teach 5 more of his friends to do it. It’s that simple!
Here’s a quick example of one of the Technique:

65 x 65 = ?

It is quite simple since both digits start from 6, so you take 6 and multiply with the next number 7 which gives you= 42 , the first part of the answer and take 5 and multiply by the next units 5 which gives you 25,so the final answer is 4225. Try 85 x 85 now. Answer 7225. Try 95 x 95 – Answer 9025 in the similar way.

Now how long did that take? This method can also be said to be the fastest in the world in mental math.

This system has the prowess to speed up Math Calculations by up to 1500% and supposedly seemingly difficult calculations like 998 x 997 can be solved in less than five seconds flat. With this system you can home school your child into becoming a Human Bio Calculator in a matter of a week’s time.

The answers to the question posed by this article in the beginning are found by understanding the ancient Indian system of High Speed Vedic (Sanskrit for Knowledge) Mathematics. It was rediscovered by Tirthaji (1884-1960) who was dux of India in Math and Sanskrit Philosopher who wrote and spoke perfect English. He reached the position of a Respected Pope in India, toured the United States in 1958 giving math lectures in Stanford, Caltech and even MIT and discovered the math knowledge which can solve every known math problem mentally and faster. He called his book and the subject ‘Vedic Mathematics’ after the Indian Scriptures called Vedas which mean knowledge. It is absolutely mathematical, scientific and global in nature and has nothing to do with any religion. Which means any person of any religion, country, ethnicity, color or race can use it and apply it and enjoy its tremendous benefits all across the world. No wonder it is being used by students from around the Globe of every race and origin to making their math calculations easier and is increasingly getting popular. Even NASA, INTEL and Microsoft are using it for the high end applications of Vedic Math.

A Look at this High Speed Vedic Mental Math tutorials and slide shows confirms the fact that it is indeed a miracle waiting to happen to your child.

Any teenager can learn Vedic Mathematics and enhance his numerical abilities. It helps the students not only in traditional academics, but it also enhances the IQ by enhancing the analytical skills and thought processes. This happens because the system is very coherent and intuitive and uses both sides of the brain thereby giving the student the winning edge. It is very satisfying to see young children’s eyes brighten when they see and learn the High Speed Vedic system and techniques.

Thomas, a 16 year old was able to apply these techniques with ease and without confusion when he learnt the Vertically and Crosswise Formula of multiplying two and three digit numbers Mentally and in One Line. He was able to solve correctly over 75 problems in less than 10 minutes which normally takes from 45-90 minutes to solve. This is simply incredible.

So how do you get started and homeschool your child into this system in a week’s time?

First your child should be over 14 years of age and should know multiplication tables upto 9. That is the only criteria to learn this system.

Try going through the High Speed Vedic Mental Math tutorials and see if your child enjoys the new methods. Show them the slide shows. You would have live results for your self whether or not to choose this as an alternative means to learn Math.

Squares of Numbers ending in 5

Multiplying numbers by 11-19 in less than five seconds

Instant Subtractions

Speed Division by 9.

See if he shows an interest. It shouldn’t overwhelm or burden him in any way. It should be as natural as possible.

Ask Questions to us. Go through the FAQ on our website below. Clarify your doubts you would have before deciding to introduce your child to it.

If you feel satisfied and your child is showing interest order a book or a DVD Set of over 10 hours on this phenomenal system which would suit your child best. I am sure if you could do these methods and are wondering why you didn’t learn them as a child-remember you could relive your childhood by introducing them to your child now. You could be igniting such a spark in your child now that he could be using this system for all his life and even introducing them to the next generation.

Give your child the best of education unattainable in schools.

By:
Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com

This Article is by Gaurav Tekriwal, who has been conducting High Speed Vedic Maths Workshops and has trained over ten thousand students across the world in the field. He is an expert in the field and revolutionizes the way children learn math.

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So after reading this, are you ready to help your 14+ year old learn math via the Vedic Math system? Or maybe YOU just want to learn this?  😉

Have a great New Year!

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Some Fun With Math

Making math interesting is what we like to do! So we’re always keeping an eye out for different ideas that will help students learn math while at the same time letting them have some fun. The article below will give you some good ideas that you can try which should help your child learn math and have fun as well.

Grab A Deck Of Cards And Try These Fun Math Games

Want to get the children practicing math skills?
You could use commercial math games but these can be expensive.
For a fun math game that assists kids to practice adding or multiplying, just grab a deck of playing cards and you’re ready.

Yes, believe it or not there are heaps of math games contained in that one pack of playing cards. Try these to begin and then have a go at inventing your own. You can practice addition, times tables, comparing numbers and numerous other number skills.

Multiplication Over and Under
This game is an ideal way to practice multiplication tables. Use a pack of cards with the colored cards taken out. The Aces count as 1. Deal all of the cards out to the two players. One player becomes the Under 30 player and the other becomes the Over 30 player.
Each player turns over a card at the same time and the two numbers are multiplied together. If the answer is below 30, the Under 30 player gets the cards. If it is more than 30, the Over 30 player keeps the cards. If the answer is 30 each player takes back their card and returns it to their deck. When all cards have been played the player with the most cards is the champion.

Highest Number
Kids love this fun math game that practices comparing numbers. All you need is cards from Ace (which is valued at 1) to 9 for this game. Next choose the number of digits to be used in the numbers for this game, e.g. 2 digit numbers like 24 and 79; 3 digit numbers like 713 or 921; 4, 5 or 6 digit numbers. Every person is dealt that number of cards. Players arrange their cards to make the biggest possible number with the cards that they have been dealt, e.g. with cards 2, 5 and 8 a player would make 852.
The player with the biggest number in each round scores a point. The winner is the person who scores the highest points.

First to Fifty Addition
Take it in turns to deal two cards to each person. Each player then turns over the two cards they have been dealt, adds the two amounts and tells how much this is, e.g. 5 and 7 is 12. The player with the largest total keeps the two cards while the other cards are returned to the deck which is shuffled and dealt again. Players add the value of the cards they have won until a player gets to fifty and wins.

First to Fifty Multiplication
Play this game the same as First to Fifty Addition but instead of adding the 2 cards to get a total, multiply the two values on the cards, e.g. 7X6 is 42. Players then add the value of the cards that they win to get to fifty.

These fun card games can be played by a parent and child at home or in the classroom with children playing in pairs, in small groups or with the whole class being divided into four or five teams. So why not grab an old deck of playing cards and start playing.

 

By: Teresa Evans

Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com

 Teresa Evans is a teacher and parent who uses fun math games to get kids excited about math. To receive your own seven part math games collection visit Making Math More Fun.

So there you have it! What do you think? Some fun card games that will help your student learn math!

 

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Math Isn’t All Fun And Games

Or is it?

After reading this article, I’m inclined to think that it should definitely involve fun and games when a child is trying to learn math! That’s one of the reasons that we encourage the children we tutor at Mathnasium of Cherry Hill to play with the games that we keep on hand!

So check out this article from GoArticles.com and see if you agree with Bonnie Adama (the author) and me!

How To Help Your Child Learn Math Using Fun And Easy Games

It’s common knowledge that young children whose parents read to them have a tremendous advantage in school. But did you know that you can also help your child learn mathematics by doing and supporting math at home – with games?

As a National Board Certified Master Teacher, I’ve been teaching math with games to children for many years, and I see that children no longer memorize their addition facts or multiplication tables. With the math curriculum as extensive as it is, teachers cannot afford to take the time to ensure that students learn the basic facts. Parents are partners in the process, and you can offer greater opportunities for your child to succeed in math if you support the learning of the basics at home.

Many years ago I discovered that math games fit the bill wonderfully! Math games put children in exactly the right frame of mind for learning. Children are normally very eager to play games. They relax when they play, and they concentrate. They don’t mind repeating certain facts or procedures over and over. In an engaging math game, children will be more focused and retention will be greater.

Dittos or workbook pages are not appropriate if you want your child to be excited about math. Children throw themselves into playing games the way they never throw themselves into filling out workbook pages or dittos.
 
Games offer a pleasant way for you to get involved in your child’s math education. You may be one of those many parents who don’t feel comfortable with math, or who assume it takes special expertise to teach it. Believe me, as a veteran teacher, when I say that you don’t have to be a math genius to play a game. With a math game, you don’t have to worry about pushing or pressuring your child. All that you have to do is propose a game to your child and start to play.

Games can help your child learn almost everything they need to master in elementary math. Games solidify the achievements of children who are already good at math, and they shore up children who need shoring up.

Children crave time spent with their parents. Because learning is a social process, children learn best through fun games that involve interaction with other people. Seize this opportunity to indulge them with your own undivided attention. Try a math game with your child. A price cannot be put on the quality of the time you will have spent together. They will have fun while learning, and they will remember those times with greater fondness than the times they spent playing the educational computer game or doing a ditto or workbook page.

There are literally hundreds of fun and easy games you can play with your kids to help them learn math and actually enjoy it! Games specific to your child’s grade level are best.

Here’s an example of a great game for Second Graders called “Get Close to 100.”

Get Close to 100 is a great game for second graders. It helps children practice double-digit addition with special emphasis on understanding place value.

Get Close to 100

What you need:
– 2 – 4 players
– deck of cards, 10s removed
– Get “Close to 100? recording sheets (below) for each player

The object of the game is to make a two-digit addition problem that comes as close to 100 as possible.

Shuffle cards and place them face down in a pile.

Player #1 turns over 4 cards and moves the cards around until he/she has created a two-digit addition problem whose sum will be as close to 100 as he/she can make it. You can go over 100. Player #1 records this problem on his/her recording sheet. Player #2 checks for addition accuracy.

Example: Player #1 draws a 4, a 7, a 2, and a 5. He/she moves the cards around until she/he decides that:

47 + 52 = 99 is the closest that he/she can get.

Player # 2 draws four cards and does the same.

The points for each round are the difference between their sum and 100.

Example: A sum of 95 scores 5 points and so does a sum of 105.

Players compare scores at the end of this first round. They put their four cards in a discard pile and player #2 begins first and turns over four more cards for the second round.

After six rounds, players total their points and the player with the lowest score wins.

These games offer you and your child the opportunity to have fun together with math, think hard, and enjoy it. How often do you say that about doing math at home?

Give a math game a try! Find more math games and great tips to help your child at: www.MathGamesAndActivities.com

About the Author:

Bonnie Adama is a National Board Certified master teacher with many years of experience at Kindergarten, First, Second, and Third grades. The last 13 years of teaching, she co-taught a multi-age classroom of first, second, and third graders. She taught all the math and science, and her teaching partner taught all the language arts. For many years, Bonnie worked as a mathematics mentor within her school and district. She retired from the Fontana Unified School District in Fontana, California in 2005.

So are you ready? Ready to try some fun and games?  😉

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The New Way To Learn Math

Don’t you just hate having to memorize things? Especially things like the multiplication tables?  I know I don’t like it much so I was very interested in this article that teaches a new way for people to learn math. Check it out – I’m sure you’ll enjoy it!

A New Way to Learn Math- The Magical Math Story
By Darren Michalczuk

Some students struggle with math. These are the students who are usually out in the hall for misbehaving, quiet and withdrawn because they don’t know the answers or complaining of headaches or stomach problems from the suffering of learning math. The signs of poor math skills come in many forms, but the message is always the same. These students don’t understand numbers.

There is a way to reach these students. To help these students a teacher or parent needs to be patient, energetic and above all willing to think outside of the box. Traditional ways of teaching math simply will not work with these students. Here you will find an example of one the methods you can use to reach a student in elementary school. It is a method that has been refined over many years and has worked with hundreds of students.

There is a story, one of several stories, which actually changes how a child looks at math. Although it is an easy story to learn, it is very specific in design. It reaches auditory, kinesthetic and visual learners and includes mnemonic devices to make numbers easy to remember. It can reach students that have struggled with math for years. It is actually more effective with younger students as it helps create an understanding of math before bad habits like finger counting develop.

The story is simple: Your mother is chasing a spider around the house when she swings and accidentally breaks the window.

For parents, this story is one you can teach to a child anywhere such as in the car on your way to soccer practice, in the living room during a commercial or while taking a walk to the corner store. You can embellish the story and make it more personal, laughing about how much Mom freaks out about the spider. You can even have the child imagine the story in great detail, talking about how big the spider is and how loud it is when the window shatters. Although the core of the story can’t be changed, it is a story that will taught uniquely by each individual teacher or parent who will add their own style and energy.

This story includes several mnemonic devices. Each image represents a specific part of a math fact, for example the number eight is represented by a spider which has a body that looks like an eight and has eight legs. It includes personal connections (Mom), imagery (a black spider), and actions (breaking the window) which will make the story stick in both the short term and long term memory. It also uses tangible images like a golf club and a spider that can be remembered more easily than abstract concepts. In short, it is a story that can be easily remembered.

The usual way for a student to learn eight times nine is to add nine together eight times. Not only is this time consuming, it is also boring. By nature this method creates confusion with other math facts as none are distinct from the others. It is easy to mix up seven times eight with six times nine. The traditional method of drill and practice takes many hours and often only reaches a few of the students in a class.

In contrast, teaching math by using vivid images of a memorable story will produce markedly different results. When asked what eight times nine is a student will recall the image for eight (a spider) and nine (golf) and the story that goes with them. They will easily remember that the house (the bigger image) represents seventy as the roof is shaped like a seven and the window (the smaller image) represents two since it has two curtains. This connects all the numbers, making it easy to remember that eight times nine is seventy two. It will work for the reverse (division) just as easily. With less than twenty unique but specific stories to learn, learning the times tables can be a fun adventure.

With all due respect to the traditions that have been successful for many students, there is a way to reach those it hasn’t worked for.

Darren Michalczuk is the founder of the Brick School. He is an experienced classroom teacher who has developed many programs and resources for math, language and music. The Brick School offers quality educational posters, programs and worksheets online for elementary language arts, math and music. Materials are designed to promote effective learning strategies in an easy to understand, straight-forward format. They offer both practical solutions to learning problems and leading edge technology and techniques. It reaches both struggling students and those who need extra challenges in class.With the latest software and leading edge learning strategies, our materials are paving the way for learning. User-friendly porgrams give students instant feedback while they practice important basic skills. Lessons and study guides also include proven learning strategies and memories techniques. Please visit our website. http://brickschool.ca

So there you have it. I told you it was interesting – right? So do you think it would be easier for you to learn math this new way as opposed to doing the old memorization techniques? Drop me a comment here and let me know what you think?

Thanks and until next time … make every day count!

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